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Plain English Scone:)

I normally cook without following the exact measurement, just by feel of the texture using my finger or follow my instinct and change it slightly here and there. I do not cook everyday so whenever I cook Arissa & Syamil will overly compliment even that is not the best meal in the world. 

They will eat and eat without complain:)




I love scone, this was my favourite breakfast during my student time. I went to Cameron Highland last year, the taste always good when you have it hot in cold weather, or during winter. This recipe is from http://www.deliaonline.com

Ingredients
 40g spreadable butter
 225g self-raising flour
 1½ level tablespoons golden caster sugar
 pinch of salt
 110ml milk, plus a ilttle more (if needed)
 a little extra flour
 Pre-heat the oven to 220°C, gas mark 7

Method

Begin by rubbing the butter into the sieved flour quickly, using your fingertips,then stir in the sugar followed by a pinch of salt. 

Now, using a knife, mix in the milk little by little, and when it’s all in, flour your hands and knead the mixture to a soft dough (you may find you need just a drop more milk if it feels at all dry). 

Place the dough on a floured pastry board and with a rolling pin (also floured) lightly roll it out to a thickness of about 3cm. (This thickness is vital. The reason scones don’t rise enough is because they are rolled too thin.) Then take the pastry cutter and tap it sharply so that it goes straight through the dough – do not twist or the scones will turn out a strange shape!

When you have cut as many as you can, knead the remaining dough together again and repeat. Then place the scones on the baking sheet, dust each one with flour and bake near the top of the oven for 12–15 minutes. 

When they’re done they will have risen and turned a golden brown. 

Then transfer them to a wire rack and eat as soon as they are cool enough, spread with butter, jam and clotted cream.

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